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When the ori­gi­nal Mer­ce­des-Benz Sprin­ter lan­ded in Ame­ri­ca almost 20 years ago, it bro­ke new ground—and roc­ked the com­mer­ci­al van world. The van world was beyond stag­nant, with every other com­pe­ti­tor fiel­ding vehi­cles with roots that stret­ched back to the 1970s. The suc­cess of that first van almost sin­gle-han­de­dly trans­for­med the com­mer­ci­al vehi­cle lands­ca­pe, making Sprin­ter a lea­der and inno­va­tor in the segment.

Today, there’s an all-new Sprin­ter that’s been reen­gi­ne­e­red and rei­ma­gi­ned from the ground up with the kind of forward-thin­king tech­no­logy and inno­va­ti­ve fea­tu­res Mer­ce­des-Benz is known for. Let’s take a look at what makes this all-new Sprin­ter the most sig­ni­fi­cant new com­mer­ci­al van in the indus­try. Built for you. The all-new Sprin­ter. Built in the USA.

Connected, Protected—and Packed with Comfort

It’s easy to see the Sprin­ter is hand­so­me and chi­se­led on the out­si­de. But it’s the fea­tu­res insi­de the cab of this workhor­se that really impress. The inte­ri­or is a major upgra­de, with a design that echo­es what’s found in Mercedes-Benz’s more exclu­si­ve car lines. Con­si­der the cli­ma­te-con­trol sys­tem. Its con­trols, vents, and swit­ch­ge­ar look and feel like they belong in a more-expen­si­ve vehi­cle. Engi­ne­ers incor­po­ra­ted a key­less start sys­tem, too—never fum­ble with your keys again.

The all-new Sprin­ter may be a workhor­se, but it abounds with cre­a­tu­re com­forts. The seats have been rede­sig­ned for more sup­port and opti­o­nal units offer fully adjus­ta­ble power memory seats with enhan­ced lum­bar sup­port and even hea­ting and ventilation.

Tech-Forward

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Every Sprin­ter comes stan­dard with an all-new MBUX mul­ti­me­dia seven-inch tou­ch-scre­en dis­play with natu­ral lan­gua­ge voi­ce recog­ni­ti­on. The opti­o­nal 10.25-inch high-defi­ni­ti­on sys­tem is a step up—it’s unli­ke what you’ll find in any other com­mer­ci­al van and looks just like the one in the Mer­ce­des-Benz E‑Class. Both offer fast inter­net con­nec­ti­vity through the per­ma­nen­tly ins­tal­led SIM card insi­de the LTE-capa­ble com­mu­ni­ca­ti­on module.

The all-new Sprin­ter offers the fle­xi­bi­lity of cho­o­sing either a gaso­li­ne or die­sel power­plant. The stan­dard 2.0‑liter four-cylin­der deve­lops 190 hp and 258 lb-ft of tor­que and comes pai­red to a nine-spe­ed auto­ma­tic. But Mer­ce­des-Benz is renow­ned for its strong, tor­que-rich and effi­ci­ent die­sels, and The all-new Sprinter’s pro­ven 3.0‑liter has the most cylin­ders in the seg­ment (six) and deve­lops a stout 324 lb-ft of tor­que as well as a lofty 190 hp—more power than any die­sel in the class. The 3.0‑liter is con­nec­ted to a new seven-spe­ed auto­ma­tic that helps lower engi­ne spe­eds whi­le crui­sing, cre­a­ting a qui­e­ter envi­ron­ment insi­de the cab and boos­ting fuel economy.

Custom Vannin’

The all-new Sprin­ter is like the mul­ti­to­ol of the van world. And that’s becau­se this big Mer­ce­des-Benz is avai­la­ble in car­go, pas­sen­ger, and cab chas­sis con­fi­gu­ra­ti­ons in two whe­el­ba­ses and a choi­ce of sin­gle, super sin­gle, or dual rear whe­els. So there’s a Sprin­ter for just about any com­mer­ci­al or per­so­nal use.

Unli­ke any other van in the Sprinter’s class, it can be opti­o­ned with 4WD right from the fac­tory flo­or. That trac­ti­on advan­ta­ge makes the Sprin­ter the only choi­ce for a vari­ety of uses, from ski-lod­ge shut­tles to over­land-sty­le off-road cam­ping machi­nes. There’s good news for tho­se that alre­ady have Sprin­ters with expen­si­ve upfit­tings insi­de their van—the dimen­si­ons insi­de the car­go hold haven’t chan­ged. That means all the cus­tom acces­so­ri­es on an old Sprin­ter will fit insi­de a new one. The Sprinter’s ver­sa­ti­lity goes bene­ath the skin too. The all-new Sprin­ter is avai­la­ble in a wide ran­ge of GVWRs, the hea­vi­est of whi­ch can achi­e­ve a class-lea­ding maxi­mum pay­lo­ad of 6,735 pounds. That’s over a full ton more than any van in its class. The Sprin­ter remains an excel­lent tow machi­ne, too, with the stou­test models able to han­dle a 7,500-pound trailer.

Built in the USA

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MER­CE­DES-BENZ

All this van good­ness is built right here in the U.S. That’s a first for Mer­ce­des-Benz vans. The com­pany has inves­ted $500 mil­li­on in its South Caro­li­na plant just out­si­de Char­les­ton to build The all-new Sprin­ter from the ground up. And that will allow cus­to­mers to order and take deli­very of the­se prac­ti­cal workhor­ses much quic­ker than ever before.


Endnotes

1. Blind Spot Assist is a war­ning sys­tem only, and may not be suf­fi­ci­ent to avoid all acci­dents invol­ving vehi­cles in your blind spot and does not esti­ma­te the spe­ed of appro­a­ching vehi­cles. It should not be used as a subs­ti­tu­te for dri­ver awa­re­ness and chec­king of sur­roun­ding traf­fic con­di­ti­ons. See Ope­ra­tor’s Manu­al for sys­tem’s ope­ra­ting spe­eds and addi­ti­o­nal infor­ma­ti­on and warnings.

2. Rear Cross-Traf­fic Alert is not a subs­ti­tu­te for acti­vely chec­king around the vehi­cle for any obs­ta­cles or peo­ple. It may not detect cer­tain objects based on their size, path, pro­xi­mity or spe­ed and angle of appro­a­ch, or due to sen­sor obs­truc­ti­on, and does not con­trol ste­e­ring angle. See Ope­ra­tor’s Manu­al for addi­ti­o­nal infor­ma­ti­on, tips and warnings.

3. Acti­ve Dis­tan­ce Assist DIS­TRO­NIC is no subs­ti­tu­te for acti­ve dri­ving invol­ve­ment. It does not adapt crui­sing spe­ed in res­pon­se to sta­ti­o­nary objects, nor does it pre­dict the cur­va­tu­re and lane layout of the road ahe­ad or the move­ment of vehi­cles ahe­ad. It is the driver’s res­pon­si­bi­lity at all times to be atten­ti­ve to traf­fic and road con­di­ti­ons, and to pro­vi­de the ste­e­ring, bra­king and other dri­ving inputs neces­sary to retain con­trol of the vehi­cle. Dri­vers are cau­ti­o­ned not to wait for the system’s alerts befo­re bra­king, as that may not afford suf­fi­ci­ent time and dis­tan­ce to bra­ke safely. Bra­king effec­ti­ve­ness also depends on pro­per bra­ke main­te­nan­ce, and tire and road con­di­ti­ons. See Operator’s Manu­al for system’s ope­ra­ting spe­eds and addi­ti­o­nal infor­ma­ti­on and warnings.

4. Acti­ve Bra­ke Assist may not be suf­fi­ci­ent to avoid an acci­dent. It does not react to cer­tain sta­ti­o­nary objects, nor recog­ni­ze or pre­dict the cur­va­tu­re and/or lane layout of the road or every move­ment of vehi­cles ahe­ad. It is the driver’s res­pon­si­bi­lity at all times to be atten­ti­ve to traf­fic and road con­di­ti­ons, and to pro­vi­de the ste­e­ring, bra­king and other dri­ving inputs neces­sary to retain con­trol of the vehi­cle. Dri­vers are cau­ti­o­ned not to wait for the system’s alerts befo­re bra­king, as that may not afford suf­fi­ci­ent time and dis­tan­ce to bra­ke safely. See Operator’s Manu­al for system’s ope­ra­ting spe­eds and addi­ti­o­nal infor­ma­ti­on and warnings.

5. Acti­ve Lane Kee­ping Assist may be insuf­fi­ci­ent to alert a fati­gued or dis­trac­ted dri­ver of lane drift and can­not be reli­ed on to avoid an acci­dent or seri­ous injury.

6. Rear­vi­ew came­ra does not audi­bly notify dri­ver of nearby objects and is not a subs­ti­tu­te for acti­vely chec­king around the vehi­cle for any obs­ta­cles or peo­ple. Ima­ges dis­played may be limi­ted by came­ra field of view, weather, ligh­ting con­di­ti­ons, and the pre­sen­ce of dirt, ice, or snow on the camera.

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